How We Purchase Our Gear

Doing our homework when purchasing products should indeed involve a responsible and ethical formula. The question thus becomes, what is a good formula for making purchases?

When it comes to hiking and backpacking gear there is no shortage of choices. Clothing, backpacks, tents, sleeping bags, quilts, pads, stoves, headlamps, trekking poles, gadgets and an endless list of “luxury” items that we are willing to carry into the backcountry. We have always advocated to try and support small cottage companies and buy local when possible with an emphasis on quality over price. But that formula has been changing as we dig a little deeper into the origins of the products we buy and how they impact, not only the economy, but the lives of others, including ourselves. All this, while maintaining a desire to acquire quality merchandise designed for our needs that provide what they promise at a price we are willing to pay.

Making the choice of where to buy can be a daunting task in and of itself. Based on certain criteria such as, buy direct, Black Friday, through a brick and mortar store, used vs new, online, scratch-n-dent or store bargain bins, the choices are vast. If that were not enough, there is the breakdown of the product itself. There are the choices to buy, or not, based on weight, size, price, brand, reviews, fit, comfort, marketing, word of mouth and memes. All of which affect how we buy, though we would have to lean towards most people probably use some sort of price – quality blend as the most likely used formula for making a purchase.

But, there is more. How often do we consider where these products are made? How often do we consider the ethics of the company we are purchasing from? Is price, availability and the speed at which we can get the item our first priority? Are we willing to wait longer if the company and product are more in line with quality over price. Would we consider ethical shopping? Is this more politics than a mere shopping experience?

Labels, labels and more labels. Made in USA, Made in China, Made in _____ is only the beginning. Other factors can easily come into play here. Assembled in_____, manufactured in_____, assembled with imported parts and materials from _____ and the list goes on and on. It can be quite overwhelming to to make a purchase if you are concerned with more than just a price, reviews and product specs.

Speaking of reviews, if those reviews are even legitimate, which is another story altogether. There are five star, four star, three star and, well, who goes below that anyway unless your looking at how bad a product is, and you should. Hopefully making a purchase is more than just “I want it now and I want it cheap”. Granted there is nothing wrong with spending your hard earned dollars responsibly, an honorable trait, there is much, much more to consider.

The politics of buying. Is the company ethical? Are the products you are purchasing ethical? Are they built to last? Are they manufactured in a manner that would reduce the carbon footprint? Is there a warranty, a good warranty? Does the company stand behind its products? Does any of this even matter? It should.

There is no denying that we live in a much smaller world now. Supporting local is good practice on so many levels. But there are times when that is just not possible or desirable. Doing our homework when purchasing products should indeed involve a responsible and ethical formula. The question thus becomes, what is a good formula for making purchases?  Good question!

Our formula, going forward, will not just be quality over price. This is more of a “when the stars align” approach. We intend to look local when possible, branching out from there. Finding the right company as close to home that will meet certain criteria. Made with products that support our local economy and are responsibly sourced, not only for the environment, but our physical well being as much. We have found  that companies who meet such criteria are not only environmentally friendly, but ethically run in all departments as well. The price tends to be a little higher, but we feel good about supporting such foundations. That, and, the products are of higher quality, made to last and are backed.

Keeping in mind, not all hiking and backpacking outings are the same. There are just so many different factors that can play a part in what you need. Trail length, weather, climate and geographical location alone will drive these decisions. From there the shopping begins. The choices mount. The questions begin. Everyone is different, their needs are different and the amount of money they will spend is different. How that money is spent will be a unique formula to say the least.

The gear we choose to take with us is our lifeline. From keeping us safe and comfortable to getting us in and out of the backcountry. We count on our gear, relying on it to perform as described and last a good amount of time. Paying for this and what is behind the product is well worth the effort that goes into purchasing them. A sound formula not only for us, but the company, its employees, the local economy and so forth. Is it perfect, no. We are just trying to do our part with what we have. Something, we’d say, should be everyone’s formula, that is, to do the best they can with what they have, in doing so, we can all make a difference.

Though not perfect, our gear to date has been a slow learning experience and continues to evolve as do we.

Debbie’s gear list from the Colorado Trail in 2019

Miller’s gear list from the Colorado Trail in 2019

Peace,

MAD

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Lightweight Shelter and Sleep System

Our sleep system and shelter has evolved over the years as our experience has grown and our needs have changed. Now in our 50s, we want lighter packs and warmer nights on trail.

When it comes to sleep systems and shelters in the backpacking world there are a vast array of materials, temperature ratings and sizes to choose from. As a couple, our needs are quite different than a single individual, like that’s some new advice you’ve never heard of! But, seriously, choosing gear that would fit our needs as a couple is still just as mind-blowing, there really are a wide variety of choices on the market today. Materials, temperature ratings, sizes, uses, tent vs hammock vs tarp vs OMG…which one are we going with! Our approach, at first, was quite simple. We need a shelter, pad(s) and sleeping bag(s). No problem, we will just go to our local outfitter, tell them we need stuff and let them drain our wallet.

Walking into a store uneducated is not the way to go. While you might think it would be OK to rely on the expert opinion of the salesperson, what you are probably getting is their own experiences, preferences and, or, what they’ve been told to say and sell. The best advice you can get from a company or representative is what the gear is designed to do, how it is made, what kind of warranty it has and what type of return policy there is. Outside of that box, it is up to you to know your own needs and begin the journey to find gear that will work best for your needs. Now comes the balancing act. What are you willing to spend? Quality gear isn’t cheap, nor do you have to break the bank to get it. Shop around, look for sales, wait for sales, be patient.

Our plan of attack:

First things first, how are we going to shelter ourselves and our gear out there in the middle of nowhere. On the trail, weather is a huge factor. In Colorado one can experience all four season in one day. Choosing a shelter to protect you and your gear from the elements is one of the most important choices you can make. When it comes to backpacking you are ultimately faced with two material choices for your shelter, Nylon and Dyneema. This will be your first hurdle. Nylon and Nylon blends are the most widely used materials for shelters, and most affordable at that. A few drawbacks are weight and water absorption that causes sagging. Dyneema on the other hand, originally designed for sails, is extremely lightweight, weather resistant and, unfortunately, expensive. Know your budget and stick to your guns when choosing material. There are many great choices on the market made with both materials.

Size matters! Most will say a two person tent will comfortably fit one person, while a three person tent will comfortably fit two. What does that say about a one person tent? Here the debate begins about the size and weight of your shelter. After all, you will be carrying it on your back, sleeping in it at night and using it periodically to get out of the rain. Find a store that carries different shelter sizes and designs. If they are not set up already, ask them to set them up, get inside, move around and see if it would work for you. Is there enough room for you and your gear? Shelter material is one thing. Shelter design is another. Are you a tent camper? Hammock? Tarp? Do you just want to skip the shelter altogether and sleep under the stars?

Once you have made a decision on a shelter, it is time to move on to your bedding. And you thought the shelter choices were many! Start with a pad, something to go between you and the ground for warmth and comfort from the cold and hard surfaces. Pads consist of closed cell foam like a yoga mat, inflatable pads like swimming floats to next to nothing sheets of thin plastic not unlike Saran and Cling Wrap! Are you a cold, warm or hot sleeper? What conditions will you be hiking in? What will the terrain be like? How much (more) weight are you willing to carry? Are you about to pull your hair out yet? The choices are daunting! Again, budget, design and comfort all come together to create a happy balance. Closed cell foam pads are not that comfortable, but that is our experience. Nor do we feel like sleeping on a thin sheet of plastic better purposed for keeping food fresh in the refrigerator. We prefer inflatable mats with nice padding and a decent r-value for insulation from the cold ground, but we do hike in the Colorado high country.

Moving on to your sleeping bag. Choose one that will be at least 10° colder than the anticipated low temperature. Easy enough, right? Here we go again. Materials on the outside are generally Nylon, though on the inside it gets tricky. Fill power! Do you want / need down, treated down or synthetic materials? We prefer down for is comfort, weight and warmth. That said, down must be taken care of not to get wet. Don’t forget, everyone has their own threshold of what cold is. Women generally sleep colder than men and Chihuahuas can add a few degrees to your sleeping bag! Moving on, a sleeping bag is not the only choice out there. Quilts are a great option for weight savings and can offer just as much comfort! Finally, yep, the bottom line, how much are you willing to spend and carry?

Our sleep system and shelter has evolved over the years as our experience has grown and our needs have changed. Now in our 50s, we want lighter packs and warmer nights on trail. Backpacking the older you get can require gear to change a bit. Again, our experiences and changes in age dictated changes to our gear choices as yours will probably do over time. So goes the evolution of the hiker! As a couple, we love to sleep as we would at home. We love to spoon and cuddle, when our chihuahua isn’t getting in the way and hogging the blankets! A benefit and survival technique for sure, sharing body heat. We have moved on from sleeping bags to a double quilt, though a double sleeping bag could also work, quilts being lighter and helping to keep overall pack weight down. We also changed from two single pads to one double sized one. Another option would be to strap two single pads together, but there is the risk of the “cold spot” in the middle and pads can move around like shifting tectonic plates.

Our new shelter is a two person Dyneema tent with two doors and vestibules, we love the weight savings and roominess of its design. Keep in mind, we are 5’7 and 5’0 and do not need a ton of space. Speaking of space, how much room will your shelter take up when looking for a place to call home for the night? A shelter’s footprint can be another big factor in making the right choice for your needs. Try using a hammock above treeline or getting in and out of a tarp shelter with one door when your partner is sound asleep. Design plays a big role in usability.

Whatever you decide, we cannot encourage you enough to educate yourself not only to your own needs when it comes to comfort level, but the choices of sizes, materials, prices and policies of the brand you will ultimately go with. There is a lot to be said about comfort and experience on the trail, not to mention a brand that will back you up in case of failure and the need for replacement or repair.

Our choices for the 2019 backpacking season:

  • Tent – Zpacks Duplex. 2p shelter made of Dyneema with an abundance of space as 2p tents go. Coming in at 23.9 oz (including stuff sack and stakes) it will be light in our packs and waterproof on trail. A single wall tent, so condensation is a factor. The two vestibules are a little small, but we don’t keep our gear outside (food bags hung in a tree), plenty of room to make coffee in the morning though!
  • Pad – Exped SynMat HL Duo (Winter). A double size pad with an r-value of 5. A great option “for us” that balances weight and comfort. Separate air chambers allow us to choose our own firmness. Separate inflation and deflation valve system is also impressive. Ours came with the “Schnozzel” pump sack to aid in inflation and keep unwanted moisture from our own breath out of the inside of the pad.
  • Sleeping Quilt – Enlightened Equipment Accomplice (10°) Double quilt with the freedom to move around and cuddle while keeping us plenty warm on those cold mountain nights all the while being light in our pack. can also be used as a blanket around camp while warming up in the morning or before bed in the evening. Very lightweight and yet surprisingly warm!

If you have any questions or comments feel free to contact us.

Peace,

MAD

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