Abyss Lake Trail

There were three water crossings ahead of us, the creeks were raging with snowmelt and the temperatures the night before had dipped below freezing. The thin log bridges that we would need to traverse were now covered in ice.

Our latest outing was in the Mt Evan’s Wilderness, a wilderness area that encompasses over 74,000 acres, has two mountains at over 14,000′ and an abundance of wildlife and trail options. We chose the Abyss Lake Trail for several reasons, a couple being water and wildlife, but mostly because it is a trail we have never been on. With our continued conditioning for the Colorado Trail, we have been backpacking routes that will challenge us and, like the CT, are unfamiliar, a factor that keeps our mental and physical faculties alert for constant change.

This outing was to be no different. We put all of our gear, food and supplies in our packs for an overnight hike. Our goal was a sub-alpine bowl centered amongst several prominent mountain peaks, two of which towered above 14,000′ in elevation. With the snow melt in full swing we knew water sources would be plentiful and the trail conditions mixed. Spring hiking in Colorado can be challenging with snow, ice, mud and water in constant battle for the trail’s surface. In most cases, one usually encounters all of these on any given path above 10,000′ as you climb higher, sometimes losing the trail or finding it somewhat obscured.

Though wanting to experience a new trail, and wanting that trail to be unfamiliar, we prepared for any and all conditions. Snowshoes and microspikes strapped to the backs of our packs, we made our way from the trailhead up the trail not knowing what we would find. Granted we were aware of what the weather forecast was calling for, we also know it can deviate and bring surprises in mountain terrain. Possible thunderstorms, overnight temperatures in the high twenties to low thirties and daytime temperatures in the sixties, we found the environment to be likely what we will be experiencing on the Colorado Trail this summer.

This outing, and the ones we have been going out on of late, are geared just to this point, preparing for a thru-hike in changing conditions and at altitude. We only have a visual overview and a rather active imagination when it comes to the Colorado Trail. Sure, we know the technicalities, but until one walks the just under five hundred mile trail, there really is no way to know what it truly is like. One could even state, each person’s journey will be completely unique , and rightly so. Alas, the trail is in constant change and provides a different story for each individual every new season.

Our hike on the Abyss Lake Trail, no different. What we planned for is exactly what we got, the unknown and ever changing conditions of a wilderness experience. Perfect training scenario in preparation for the CT. Our hike up was mostly uneventful, and finding our destination came rather easy. Once there we began our tasks of making camp. Tent in place, water filtered and lunch made, we settled in and enjoyed our new alpine surroundings. Evening came and with it a few passing thunderstorms that had us shelter in our tent until they passed. Afterwards a little exploration and back to camp for the night.

It wasn’t until the next morning that our uneventful expedition would change and the wilderness would have a few lessons in store for us. We gathered our belongings, packed our gear and headed out on our trek back to civilization. We thought, well, at the very least we got a decent workout and some more experience with our gear. Simple enough, or so we thought. The first four letters of wilderness are anyone’s clue to their surroundings when in the high country. Expect the unexpected.

There were three water crossings ahead of us, the creeks were raging with snowmelt and the temperatures the night before had dipped below freezing. The thin log bridges that we would need to traverse were now covered in ice. With no way around we contemplated waiting on the heat of the sun, several hours away. We looked up and down stream, no go. The decision was made, we would cross on our hands and knees. Our hands and knees were freezing and slipping on the ice, the spray from the water raging beneath was frigid, and the roar was deafening. The log bridge seemed to grow in length as we inched our way across the ice with full packs on our backs and Mia secure in her front pouch.

One down, two more to go. We can do this, we thought to ourselves. Our new found confidence was quickly put on hold as we came near a bull moose staring at us just off trail. Slowly and gently we moved on as not to startle him any more than we already may have. Sigh of relief followed by another heart pounding moose encounter. This time a female on trail coming straight for us. We all met with our eyes long enough to say “shit” or however a moose might say it! She must have thought, these two and their little chihuahua must be crazy because she no sooner turned and went the other way disappearing into a thick aspen grove as we began breathing again.

With bridge number two now in sight we saw another hiker sitting on the bank waiting for the sun and watched curiously as we did our eloquent ice crawl to the other side. He reluctantly followed in like fashion. Perhaps it was the first bridge or maybe the two moose, but now we were on a mission. After we crossed the last ice laden bridge we were home free, settled in and began a more leisurely hike to the parking lot. Enjoying the last views of swollen white-water creeks, lazy morning meadows, dense mixed forests of pine and aspen, all backdropped by snowcapped peaks, we hated to leave. The Colorado Trail will have so much more!

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail #3

We were thinking this is just going to be a unique season in the high country, but the more we thought about it, they are all unique. Every season offers up its own particular experience. Every day has its own personal gift for the adventurer.

June 2019, 2 months till the Colorado Trail

Time is speeding up. We now have two months until we begin our journey of hiking the Colorado Trail end to end from Durango back to Denver. It would be a lie to say we are not getting a little anxious. While our gear choices and route planning are all but done, we still continue to iron out the small details, all of which can quickly feel overwhelming if not kept in check. Final menu choices, how we will advance our supplies along the route and where exactly we will stay at those towns we have already chosen for our resupply points are still being thought out. But those are all normal issues that we have known will need to be addressed as we get closer to our departure.

A thru hike of any length will have logistical issues that will need to be considered at some point, and likely will change several times throughout the planning stages. Being fluid is key, while being dogmatic about everything can become exhausting. A happy balance is needed, especially in light of the fact that the traveler of the CT does not change the trail, on the contrary, the trail changes the traveler. Keeping in mind the trail itself is in constant change, the first four letters of WILDerness is a statement to that.

The 2019 hiking season is already abuzz with trail conditions and the impact winter has had. Amongst the most talked about for the Colorado and Continental Divide trails, along the high routes through Colorado, snow depths. If one were paying close attention over the winter and the now spring months, it will quickly become apparent that there are, and will be, a few route finding issues after an above average snowfall season. In the aftermath there have been severe avalanches, known and yet to be known. After the melt off there will likely be surprises on trail that will be uncovered, reroutes or difficult terrain crossings will certainly exist.

Living in Colorado, we have seen and heard about all these reports all too frequently in the last few months while continuing with our plans. We were thinking this is just going to be a unique season in the high country, but the more we thought about it, they are all unique. Every season offers up its own particular experience. Every day has its own personal gift for the adventurer. Accepting these constant changes is just something people have to do. No one sets off to explore and experience the great outdoors in a predictable manner. Predicting that it will be unpredictable is as good as it gets. Training, knowledge and preparation of long-term backpacking in an alpine environment, alongside having the proper gear and clothing is the best we can do.

Preparation has been our motto all along. It is who we are, how we operate. We don’t like surprises, granted we accept they do and will exist. The amount of snow Colorado received over winter was definitely a surprise, but one we calculated as a risk, a risk we built into our plan as we scheduled a late start for our thru-hike early on. What surprises we are unable to account for come in the form of our personal lives. We all have those on any given day, it is called life. We have had our share in that department and will continue to do so, responding to such and their impacts on our lives is the meat of our ability to move forward. As we get closer to our departure to begin our CT adventure, it becomes crucial that all of our ducks are in a row, both technically and personally.

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail #1

“Trail life is full of oohs and awes, but they are also filled with sighs, four letter words and pain”

January 2019, 6 months till the Colorado Trail

Many adventures begin with vision, albeit a personal challenge, a quest for spiritual awakening, a test of physical endurance or just a plain desire to explore uncharted territories never seen before. Adventures allow us to embark on journeys that impact us on so many levels. For us, our desire to hike the Colorado Trail in its entirety is probably more of a mix, encompassing aspects of all of the above. Though desire and vision can have skewed lines, reality usually swoops in and serves up a surprise, delivering, if you will, what you need instead. That said, our first installment of “The Colorado Trail” should be compared to the last. We will see you on the backside!

As we move through the planning and preparation stages of hiking the Colorado Trail, the vision still remains the same, granted how it will unfold seems to be changing the more in tune we become with the details. We know it will be tough, no backpacking trip we have ever taken was easy. Trail life is full of oohs and awes, but they are also filled with sighs, four letter words and pain. To see the remote wilderness firsthand is no easy endeavor, hence the remote part. One would be a fool not to expect challenging conditions full of hardships that must be overcome in order to embrace the reward. Long days on trail, encountering rough terrain, ever-changing weather, endless pounding of your feet, tired legs and the mind games we tend to grapple with as each false summit is reached are all part of backpacking. To glorify such extensive treks without talking about the difficulties would be irresponsible on our part, only setting others less traveled up for failure.

These constant reminders beg the question we have all no doubt asked ourselves at one time or another, “why am I doing this?” The answer comes just as the question itself is asked, “the silence of remote beauty, the stillness of the mind when the modern world is left behind and the imaginative ponderings of what lies beyond the next mountain peak draw us in.” Many will indeed walk to the edge of the world, few will take the leap into the unknown. Fear has a long history of keeping us locked into the comfort of our own personal domains, where curiosity opens the door. Stepping forward through that door is a decision that must be made with a combination of a sound mind and a form of lunacy. Who in their right mind would walk 500 miles, or more, exposed to the elements and trekking across difficult mountainous terrain? Someone crazy enough to do it, yet sane enough to understand the dangers.

Currently, on our kitchen table, across the living room, into the bedroom and basically on any unoccupied flat space available, we have accumulated information, gear and necessary items for our CT adventure. Each has purpose, even multipurpose if we are doing it right. Our gear is as light as we can get it while still remaining comfortable on trail. Our necessities for safety easily fall into the must go category, and go whether we like it or not. Then there is the plethora of information strewn about that we read through that fits perfectly in the backs of our minds filed away as mental notes. If such items were to be physically carried we would need a team of pack mules along for the ride. Food and water are paramount. The science behind how much to take, what we should take and when to eat can be as daunting as the first big climb. Alas, these things are all part of a successful outing into the unknown and untamed Colorado Rocky Mountain wilderness.

Route planning seems pretty straightforward, glancing at the map(s). But, and that is a rather big pause for consideration, just because we can draw a line from here to there doesn’t answer the many questions of how far we will, or need, to travel on any given day. It won’t necessarily tell you which water sources will be available at any given time. And, by and far, no map in the world will tell you the weather! Many of these question can be preplanned, but certainty won’t necessarily come until that moment arrives. Flexibility on trail is another key to a successful outing. The following statement addresses this, spelling out variables that will be addressed on trail. Knowing the situation will arise is planning enough sometimes, being open to various contingencies is a must.

“Day 3, feeling strong, twenty mile water carry, three days worth of food, mostly downhill with one major climb, sixteen miles(?), water and camping through miles 11-16, let’s hope for good weather.”

This is where we really dig in and begin to eat and breathe the CT and its many attributes that bind together our desire and vision. Drawing from varied sources such as past hikers, trusted meteorologists, gear manufacturers, printed and digital materials, we prepare both physically and mentally. We prepare for the known and unknown. We wait patiently for our first steps that will thrust us into an adventure of a lifetime.

Peace,

MAD

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300 Crossings of Three Mile Creek

Three Mile Creek is no eye popping outing, it has few features many would seek when it comes to hiking in the alpine. Though what it does offer is serenity.

There is a simple reason that keeps many people from venturing into the crystallized and icy landscape of Colorado’s high country in winter, cold. Bone chilling temperatures that seemingly pass through one’s body without a greeting or a goodby. The stillness silently encasing the landscape in a wintry cocoon while the swirling winds create majestic and surreal patterns of artwork across the frigid earth. Granted those chilling affects on the roadways and trails can be somewhat tedious, but with planning, proper gear and breaks in the weather, winter can be an amazing opportunity to open your senses to a completely different hiking experience.

In the shadow of several peaks within the Mt Evans Wilderness lies an overlooked trail that doesn’t boast big views, on the contrary, here you will find the peace and quiet of an ever-changing landscape of wildlife, babbling creeks and dense forests. In such fertile places, if one were to just stop and let their senses absorb the surroundings, it becomes clear how much is actually taking place around them. Three Mile Creek is no eye-popping outing, it has few features many would seek when it comes to hiking in the alpine. Though, what it does offer is serenity. The imagination is given much to entertain itself with as the world around is alive and in constant natural change. Foliage following the color spectrum driven by the seasons. Wildlife dancing about in the woods, foraging and maintaining a life seldom witnessed. Three Mile Creek itself flowing effortlessly as the lifeblood of this intimate natural world.

The trail slowly makes its way up a drainage that seemingly, without notice, places the explorer at the base of several respectable peaks ranging from 11,000′ to 13,000′ as well, Mt Evans and Mt Bierstadt, both coming in at over 14,000′. But these features are not what this trail boasts, though an obvious notion to the lack of sunlight in the early morning and late evening hours. There are numerous crossings, back and forth over Three Mile Creek, so much so we dubbed it 300 Crossings of Three Mile Creek. This is a trail of keeping your eyes down and around versus up and in the clouds. There is life happening here. Aspen groves, dense woods, small meadows, wildlife and Three Mile Creek are the stars at this performance. A day hike would certainly make for a good outing, while an overnight trip would bring one closer to a more personal experience with all that is taking place here. The motion of nature never seems to stop, a hint to the hiker of these woods to slow down and witness all that is taking place.

Exploring Three Mile Creek would best be done in fall. The plentiful aspen groves with their amazing gold, red and green colors would make for the perfect leaf peeping opportunity. A few miles in, there are welcoming meadows with ample room for a tent or a blanket to take time to kick back, relax and absorb nature Colorado style. The overnight adventurer would do well to take extra time to head higher and summit one of the mountain tops for a grand lay of the land. A multi-day excursion could only prove exceptional, traveling deeper into the Mt Evans Wilderness and its untamed primeval back country. Whatever your style of hiking, you will find Three Mile Creek an oasis within a region that draws plenty of summer crowds.

Peace,

MAD

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Giving Hope to the Hopeless

“We never thought in a million years we would have a Chihuahua in our home, much less be hiking all over Colorado with one”

Not long ago we found ourselves looking through posts of animals who were in need of a home. It is really difficult and heartbreaking for us to see so many abused and helpless animals being mistreated and abandoned on a daily basis. We do what we can, but it continues and our resources are limited against the endless stream of animals in need.

One photo caught our eye, we reluctantly inquired, took a trip to our local county animal shelter and found ourselves falling in love with one of the most pitiful sights you could imagine. Scared, underweight and not daring to make eye contact with her empty, lifeless eyes, we picked her up and held her close, something she had never had before. Trembling nonstop and wondering what life had in store for her next, we spoke softly, gave her our body heat and tried desperately to instill in her that the life she had before was gone and one she had lost hope for would be her new reality.

Giving hope to the hopeless is no easy task, especially since the only life she has ever experienced and anticipated were days filled with pain – physically, mentally and spiritually. Sadly, she has known no other way of life. Rescue dogs can be quite challenging and emotionally difficult to deal with, forget the patience needed, there is a vacancy in their eyes that tells a story of the pain and fear they have embedded deep within them. But life for our little Mia would change, did change, is still changing. Each day is new and those negative experiences slip farther and farther in the past, being replaced with love, compassion and safety.

We never thought in a million years we would have a Chihuahua in our home, much less be hiking all over Colorado with one. Months have gone by, it is so amazing to see the transition she has made, though still sad to see the damage that was done and continues to haunt her. We wait, show her wonders and make life as positive as possible for her daily. Amazingly, we are beginning to see that she is full of love, loyalty and affection, she just needed a family to share it with.

Mia, the name she came with, given to her by the animal shelter, has indeed turned a corner. Though she still cowers when she hears loud noises, runs under the bed during storms and is basically attached to us every breathing moment, we see life in her eyes, joy in her little puppy heart and excitement for each new day. She loves hiking with us and runs to the door dancing when we grab our gear. The people we come across on the trail are always taken aback by a little Chihuahua backpacking in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. She is a serious bed hog, though an incredible cuddler. When you meet her for the first time, don’t worry about her being a little “ruff” around the edges, before long you’ll have a new friend and possibly a wet nose.

Peace,

MAD

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To Hell and Back – Hell’s Hole Mt Evans Wilderness

For us, Hell’s Hole was far from anything evil. If there is a negative, it is found in the first two miles of the trail and the constant climb. But don’t let that stop you, the aspen groves and dense forest will work wonders on your psyche, whereas the uphill battle will reward you with grand views the higher you climb.

Fall hiking in Colorado is by far one of the best times to explore the high alpine. Cool temperatures, calm weather and thinning summer crowds leave one generally alone on their adventure. The transition of the seasons brings with it much colder mornings and nights, though a bulk of the day will be spent enjoying pleasant sunshine that allows for maximum output on the trail without overheating. This is a great time to take notice of the circle of life. Decaying leaves, branches and downed trees all fading away prepare the soil for fertile conditions and future growth. After the snow begins to melt in the spring the ground will bring forth a new generation.

On our latest adventure we explored the adjacent valley to the Chicago Lakes trail in the Mt Evans Wilderness. Often wondering what the landscape behind Gray Wolf Mountain would be like, we put our imaginations to rest and headed up to Hell’s Hole. The name is intriguing enough to get the mind wandering about with visions of ghouls and goblins so close to Halloween. Needless to say, the only demons we encountered were our own!

Hell’s Hole is certainly not a destination you’d find in any horror movie. Though the deep spruce forests on the way up to timberline might keep one’s peripheral vision on alert, not to mention the Bristlecone Pines and their somewhat ghostly appearance. Once the trail breaks open on the high tundra all fears are left behind at the immensity of your new surroundings. An awe inspiring environment to say the least.

Bring along a lunch, kick back and experience views seldom had. If your are lucky enough, elk and big horn sheep can be seen grazing about. Stay the night and witness a sunset and sunrise from your tent that would leave anyone speechless with utter amazement. There’s just something intriguing about the energy of fall and its impact on the environment, wildlife and humanity… granted we allow ourselves the opportunity to embrace it… where nature and wildlife know it as a constant. Unfortunately, many of us have all but removed ourselves from the wild and untamed wilderness and its impact on us, seen and unseen.

For us, Hell’s Hole was far from anything evil. If there is a negative, it is found in the first two miles of the trail and the constant climb. But don’t let that stop you, the aspen groves and dense forest will work wonders on your psyche, whereas the uphill battle will reward you with grand views the higher you climb. This hike certainly worked its magic on us. If for anything, it worked any negativity out of us, absorbing it, if you will, just like the leaves, branches and downed trees of the forest. For that, we are truly grateful for nature’s affects. Another reason we do what we do.

It is hard to imagine this trail as “less traveled” when read about on hiking reviews. But, as was our experience, we only encountered one individual on the trail apart from a few leaf peepers near the trailhead, plenty of aspen groves! Perhaps the name scares people away. Perhaps the initial ascent. Perhaps because this trail sits in the shadows of several popular peaks, Mt Evans, Mt Bierstadt, Gray Wolf Mountain and even that of Mt Spalding. Perhaps Hell’s Hole is just a semi-well kept secret for those in need of an escape. Suffice it to say, this trail well give you just that, and more, as it works its magic on you too.

Peace,

MAD

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Lake Isabelle, A Visit With an Old Friend

Standing here while looking over the edge, the imagination leaps with excitement at the potential adventures.

We have hiked many trails in Colorado of which there have been a wide variety of differing landscapes, all unique to their own region. Each presenting us with beautiful and amazing opportunities for exploration and discovery that fill the imagination. The affects on us have been awe-inspiring, physically and spirituality, prompting us to continue on, seeking out new destinations deeper and deeper into the unknown.

Of the many places we have been so blessed to encounter, one of the most special to us is the Indian Peaks Wilderness. Our draw is no doubt evident for the exceptional beauty of a land filled with clear running streams, towering snow covered peaks, abundant wildlife and lush vegetation. But there’s more here, more than meets the eye, an energy that finds its way deep inside your soul as if it’s a very dear friend welcoming you back to the warmth and security of home.

This is a place we continue to return to throughout the years. A place we feel akin to and protective of. A place of balance and harmony where nature is not just something to see, but something to feel and embrace with your complete being.

Within this fascinating wilderness, not terribly far for even the novice hiker, a high alpine lake awaits, Lake Isabelle. The lake is third in a string of lakes as you follow the trail next to the glacial fed stream that fills them throughout the year.

Standing next to Lake Isabelle’s outlet, one can see a majority of this expansive alpine ecosystem and how it is vital to the circle of life. From the Isabelle Glacier high above, thru the Lake Isabelle basin and down into the valley below, the outlet stream cascades downward on its journey to Long Lake, Brainard Lake and beyond where it finds its way onto the lowlands miles away.

In between each lake, lush forests and meadows are alive and teaming with vegetation and wildlife. A delicate landscape that evolves with the turning of time as each season passes. Winter, spring, summer and fall each have a natural cause and effect. Not surprisingly so, and not in a natural way, so does the presence of humans. Tread carefully, stay the trail and leave no trace so that this mountain environment remains healthy and generations to come will enjoy its unique beauty.

For the more adventurous, Lake Isabelle is not a final destination, but merely a stopping point to an incredible backcountry experience. Continue beyond the lake and explore the Isabelle Glacier and several peaks. There is also a notable, and obvious trail junction heading higher to Pawnee Peak and Pass where you find yourself gazing downward into yet another expanse leading to distant lakes, waterfalls and peaks of the Cascade Creek Trail system. Standing here while looking over the edge, the imagination leaps with excitement at the potential adventures.

Choose your favorite season, fill your backpack accordingly and step into the alpine world of the Indian Peaks Wilderness. A day hike to Lake Isabelle or beyond will certainly not disappoint the explorer of nature.

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail

Turning fifty, physically, was like a light-switch was flipped and stuck in the on (or off, depending on how you look at it) position. The mental fight began soon after. Hiking the Colorado Trail just seemed like the right thing to do.

In 2017 we wanted to hike the Colorado Trail. But, as it were, life has a way of dictating what we do and what we do not do. There are times when we wonder if we are really in control, or if we are merely allowed to make decisions based on current events. The later seems more likely.

Why the Colorado trail? Why not! We live in Denver and love exploring the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Day hikes and backpacking are a big part of our lives. Being in nature is a great way to unwind, relax and clear our heads of the junk we’d rather not think about.

But, really, 486 miles, Denver to Durango? Seems a bit lofty to some. There are definitely longer thru hikes we could take, not to mention shorter ones. The Colorado Trail just happens to be in our backyard and has a draw to it that is somewhat unexplainable. It just feels right. The current plan, the CT in 2018. Is that etched in stone, is anything? Just like Colorado weather, no one really knows what tomorrow will bring until they actually experience it. We can plan, prepare and hope that everything falls into place all we want, but the future remains a mystery until it happens.

Hiking in your fifties is certainly not like hiking in your twenties. It would be nice to complete the Colorado Trail sooner than later. One can only imagine how hard it must get as we age. Though, speaking of goals, we plan to hike until our legs are taken away from us, and then we’ll just look for some mobility device, buy an RV, crawl or move to some distant mountain hideaway.

Alas, here we sit on the back half of life, if you will, looking forwards and backwards. There’s been so much, there will be so much more. Amazing how we find ourselves at this odd crossroads, not necessarily on the map, and yet here it is. We’re fiftyish now and wondering what’s next. Funny, it was never a real worry before, but for some strange reason we find ourselves contemplating something we never thought would be a notion to consider. It’s quite silly really, why is this time the midlife meme? Who or what gave it power? Of all the things we could be thinking about, our minds, like our bodies, fell prey to this phenomenon of turning fifty. It’s like a built in mechanism that is time released.

Most days are like, yeah, we’re in the fifty crowd, we got our AARP cards in the mail, we grunt a little more now, things are starting to go. Other days are like, big deal, we’re still here, still together and still moving forward, like we have a choice. We count our blessings, we think back on all the memories and look forward to even more. We still have plenty of wants. Our bucket list, if we actually made one, seems to becoming more of a priority list vs the perpetual “one day” list.

Not putting too much emphasis on numbers, fifty never was much of a date on the horizon, though now, perhaps, that understanding might have changed. It was just a number, just another day, and just another year. Yet, somehow, someway, turning fifty, physically, was like a light-switch was flipped and stuck in the on (or off, depending on how you look at it) position. The mental fight began soon after. Hiking the Colorado Trail just seemed like the right thing to do.

To that, we are motivated more than ever to keep ourselves moving, maintaining a healthy (healthier) diet and exercising regularly (more regularly). Adjustments to our hiking gear, trail food and trail duration are modifications we are looking at closely. Let’s face it, thru hiking is not easy, doing it at fiftyish isn’t helping matters, but we can and will complete the trail with the proper gear and mindset. For now, plan the hike and keep ourselves fit and healthy.

We’ll either hike it thru or in segments. Capturing, embracing and absorbing every moment as they come. The plan is to document our adventure by taking innumerable amounts of photos, endless videos, and stitching them together by segment, 28 of them to be exact.

There’s a lot of hype in the thru hiking world about pack weight. Quality hiking gear isn’t cheap. Replacing it with ultra-light gear isn’t that easy, if even needed. Most emphasize base weight, that is, everything but food and water, consumables in a nut shell. We’re guessing people want to take less and be lighter on their feet, ultimately less time on the trail. While less might be more comfortable while in motion, there is a level of comfort each of us has to consider, otherwise we become miserable and want off the trail. For us a balance must be found. Let’s face it, if you love the outdoors, you most likely want to spend more time there, not less. A quick hike doesn’t necessarily make for an opportunity to embrace all the trail has to offer. We’d rather slow down, smell the wildflowers and take it all in. If that means a little extra weight on our backs, so be it.

We are still planning on hiking the CT, follow along with us on one of our social media outlets and see what we are up on any given day and future plans!

Peace,

MAD

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Mueller State Park

Have you ever had a plan, got stuck in traffic and then changed everything, direction and all, and found yourself far and removed from the original destination?

This trip was supposed to be in Rocky Mountain National Park. However, due to an accident and a general distaste for traffic, we altered our course and found ourselves at Mueller State Park, 135 miles in the opposite direction! Seems we broke all the rules on this outing, finding ourselves to be quite, shall we say, unorganized and without pep in our step. We were in no hurry to get up and out the door, though determined to hike. We made lackadaisical plans for a sunset hike in Rocky Mountain National Park. Nothing wrong with that. A nice late day hike till the sun would fade behind the ridges and back for a few photos of the late day colors mixing above the high peaks before heading home. Sounds like a plan.

Out the door, determined as we were, more like, hey…whatever happens happens. Well, it was not long before we ate our own words. We normally get up, leave and arrive at the trailhead before first light. Leaving midday is not something we are accustomed to. And yet, here we were 45 minutes later still in town, red light after red light and soon in a long line of cars creating your typical traffic jam…an accident was blocking our way.

We could see the mountains, and yet were sitting motionless in town making no headway. Once again, determined, we altered course. A left, a right, another left and a few more rights…we were headed south needing to go north. Have you ever had a plan, got stuck in traffic and then changed everything, direction and all, and found yourself far and removed from the original destination? Next thing you know, we were altering our plan by making no plan at all…just drive, away from the city. A few hours later, “there’s Pikes Peak, isn’t Mueller State Park around here?” Keep in mind, this scenario should be, “there’s Longs Peak, Rocky Mountain National Park is just around the corner.”

Map in hand, and finally on a trail, we relaxed and began to leave it all behind. Quiet, alone with nature, we walked. Mueller State Park is a sleepy forested area full of wildlife near Pikes Peak, Woodland Park and Colorado Springs. The surprise of the day, we now know where our next fall colors hike will be next year!!! Mueller SP is loaded with aspen meadows. But, until then, shhhh, it is a secret.

After a nice hike and some exploration of a few vantage high points, we had dinner in the woods as the sun began to go down. Back in the truck, we found ourselves taking a lazy drive through the park and then on to a small highway. We watched the sky change and the last light of day sink behind the high peaks and finally the ridge lines leaving only a silhouette of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. A surprise change of events with the same results. Nothing like living in the moment.

Peace,

MAD

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Staunton State Park

Great fall colors, a surprise wildlife encounter and plenty of nature to go around, we were successful at getting our bodies and minds to take a day off.

Staunton State Park is a great place to explore just an hour west of Denver. With plenty of trails for all, one could easily find themselves alone for much of the day. Rock climbing, mountain biking, hiking, trail running…choose your activity and enjoy a wonderful park in Denver’s backyard. Amazing that in very little time, one can be out of the city and on a trail enjoying one of the best benefits of living in Colorado, the outdoors.

Not every hike needs to be a heart-pounding expedition to the top of a mountain summit, though we are not against that. Taking time out to just meander is crucial to allowing ourselves to relax, unwind and decompress. Taking on an alpine trail well above treeline can be brutal, though enjoyable all the same, on this outing we chose a much lower terrain, keeping ourselves amidst forests and meadows. A quick glance at the park map and we made up our minds on making a custom 6.6 mile “lollypop” loop.

Our track, Davis Ponds Trail – Chase Meadow Trail – Staunton Ranch Trail – Scout Line Trail – Marmot Passage Trail – Staunton Ranch Trail – Chase Meadow Trail – Davis Ponds Trail back to the parking area.

Great fall colors, a surprise wildlife encounter and plenty of nature to go around, we were successful at getting our bodies and minds to take a day off. There’s something to be said about taking oneself out of chaotic environment and putting yourself into something much more soothing. In our case, nature. The sounds, smells, sights and energy of being in the wilderness just seem to detoxify us. Cool breezes, running streams, birds singing and at times pure silence are the main ingredients to a relaxing day on the trail.

Peace,

MAD

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