Colorado Trail Segment 28 of 28

We could see the parking lot now, we were almost laughing with excitement as we took our last steps and arrived at the southern terminus. We took off our packs and just deflated, as if on cue, in an emotional end to an incredible journey.

Colorado Trail Segment 28 of 28

Start: Kennebec TH

End: Junction Creek TH

Distance: 21.5 miles

We did it! We completed the Colorado Trail, hiking 486 miles from Denver to Durango and some 90,000 feet of vertical elevation gain over the entirety of the trail. It has been several weeks now since we returned home and are still in awe of our month long adventure. The CT is an absolutely amazing trail to hike. It is the epitome of all that Colorado is, from the plains to the high peaks and everything in between. From flat open travel to craggy heart pounding ridgelines high above the world, the Colorado Trail will engage the traveler both physically and mentally. It will challenge and reward you at the same time. The landscape, the wildlife and the weather all play a part in this journey of a lifetime. Indeed, an achievement to be proud of. The Colorado Trail is not all about hiking though, the towns you visit and the people you meet along the way are as much the trail. We were so happy to have met, hiked with and exchanged many great stories with our “tramily” (trail family) on trail. Such wonderful people with so many different backgrounds and one common goal, all hiking the Colorado Trail. We will always cherish our new found friends, their support and encouragement. Congratulations David F, Lucky, Sleep Walker, Oofta, Daddy Long Legs, Scout, Hodgepodge, Dude, Turquoise, Puppy Love and the many other great people we met and hiked with, you guys are all amazing. Thank you to all the trail angels we came across, who gave us rides, fed us and sent us off regenerated. Many, many thanks to everyone who helped, supported and kept us in their daily thoughts. There wasn’t a time on trail we didn’t feel as if someone wasn’t watching over us. Call it luck, call it what you will, every need we encountered was met and fulfilled. The trail definitely provided in its own way and in its own timing.

Segment 28 began after a dramatic end to segment 27. Traversing the Indian Trail Ridge, crossing through the surrounding alpine region and the drop into Taylor Lake were absolutely incredible. As we arrived at the Kennebec Trailhead to begin the last 21 miles of the trail, we paused, looked back to the north, bid farewell to all that we had experienced and stepped over into the final miles of our epic adventure. This was it, the final miles. We had actually walked from Denver to Durango traveling through, up, over and down some of the most beautiful wilderness areas we have ever seen. We had been hiking exposed for a while and really wanted to find some shade. We needed a break. After a rant and some venting about having hiked nearly 500 miles and not finding sufficient ground to relax on, we finally found a few lone trees where we stopped for lunch. We sat, took in a deep breath, updated everyone about our whereabouts and readied ourselves for the final push. We could see Indian Trail Ridge and watched in the early afternoon sun as a small single cloud quickly erupted into a threatening thunderstorm. It only took a few minutes. We recounted the dangers of hiking on exposed ridges and felt good about our decision to wait as we did until the following morning to go over the ridge. 21 miles, that’s it, from here it is nothing more than a quick overnight hike.

We gathered our gear, threw on our packs and were off down the trail. Our next goal, Slide Rock, a very steep, narrow section of trail that crosses a long and nerve-racking scree field. Nothing compares to a real time experience. We had seen pictures of this area, but those do nothing to prepare you for actually walking across it. The earth moved under our feet as the fear of slipping and falling was a constant reminder to take careful and precise steps. Having hiking poles, shoes with good traction and uninterrupted concentration are the key here. Though, our “trail runners” now had hundreds of miles on the tread, our hiking poles were getting caught in the rocks and our concentration was constantly being interrupted by the incredible scenery and the drop off. Slow and steady. The continued decent down into the canyon was a return back to dense foliage, creeks and softer ground underfoot. We hiked at a steady pace heading for the bottom only to rise back up later that evening on our last climb of the CT, a 1,000 foot incline back towards the rim of the canyon to a camping area that would put us only ten miles from the finish the next morning. It had been a very long day of hiking and we were whooped. Where our energy came from to complete this one last climb is a mystery to us, but we did it, we were positioned well for a quick and easy finish.

We reached the top of the climb and were greeted to a warm welcome from some of our tramily that we had caught up to. Seems we were all on the same page as far as mileage, campsites and the plan for a short 10 mile hike to the finish the next morning. We were all camped in a densely wooded and tight ravine with little to no flat places to properly set up our tents. After the climb we were so tired, so we just didn’t care. Everyone had their spot, shrugged their shoulders and thought, “it’ll do.” We made camp, enjoyed stories and were soon all off to our tents for the night. We spent the evening on a slope, constantly having to reposition in our tent, only to slide back down. This comedy act would last all night. If that were not enough, we began hearing heavy steps, snapping and breaking outside the tent all around our camp. Someone asked, “what is that?” A pause followed by an explanation, “we’ve got cows!” Everyone emerged from their tents, headlights shining in all directions as several cows and their calves were making their way uphill through our campsite. The cows seemed to look at us with a blank stare that said, “humans, you goofballs, what are you doing here?” They slowly made passage and went on about their business. Everyone got back in their tents as the last comment was made, “what if they come back, they are not the most graceful of creatures!?” We all laughed. The next morning we awoke to a passing rain shower and thought, if the terrible camping area and cows were not enough, now this. It was such a pathetic situation you couldn’t help but laugh about it. Soon enough we would all be finishing and getting clean, sleeping in soft beds and eating like kings and queens. Our last night on trail with our tramily was truly memorable, hilarious and pathetic, but memorable. We had survived Cowgate 2019!

Only ten miles to go, we walked with purpose, recounting the trail and the incredible trek we had been on. We wanted clean clothes, a hot shower and a good meal. That last ten miles seemed to stretch on and increase! We began seeing day hikers and hearing the Durango-Silverton Train’s whistle echo throughout the trees. We were getting close and very excited. We got to Gudy’s Rest, the last big landmark on the trail and great spot to reflect on the past month, where we met up with another tramily member. The excitement was obvious on all of our faces. We sat, relaxed and took our last break on the Colorado Trail before heading back out for the final four miles. We pointed out the “lasts” on trail, our last creek crossing, our last bridge, our last hill, our last aspen, our last footsteps. We could see the parking lot now, we were almost laughing and giggling with excitement as we took our last steps and arrived at the southern terminus. We took off our packs and just deflated, as if on cue, in an emotional end to an incredible journey. One of our tramily members, David F, was there waiting with celebratory cold drinks and a big congratulations. We all took pictures and awaited other tramily members to make their grand exit. After a small celebration, sharing of stories and after everyone had left, we stood there, as we had started over a month ago in Denver, just the two of us and allowed it to sink in. We had successfully hiked the Colorado Trail. A dream now become reality, a lifetime achievement, complete. We now add another wonderful chapter in our lives together, the Colorado Trail, and how we hiked it, together.

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail Segment 26 of 28

Our pace was quick, our focus acute, we were only 53 miles away from the southern terminus of the Colorado Trail.

Colorado Trail Segment 26 of 28

Start: Bolam Pass Road

End: Hotel Draw Road

Distance: 10.9 miles

Where segment 26 might be short on mileage, it makes up with big views. Perhaps better put, segment 26 is a where all the unique features of the Colorado Trail come together in one segment. If you only had time for a short hike and wanted to experience everything the CT has to offer, this would be a great choice. Full of twists and turns, there is a surprise view around every corner. At this stage of writing all the blog posts and putting together all the videos for each segment, we almost feel as if we are just repeating ourselves, and perhaps we are, but the fact remains, there are amazing larger than life views along this nearly 500 mile long trail from Denver to Durango! From deep down in the fertile valleys, through dense enchanted forests, across high exposed ridgelines and over majestic mountain peaks, there is good reason why the CT exists. Beyond the hard work and planning that went into the creation of it or the continued yearly maintenance from amazing volunteers, the trail exists because there is no denying the beauty of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. There is an adventure here and it was captured for all to enjoy. But not every thru-hike on the CT will be the same, each one is unique and new.

Our favorite portion of this segment was hiking up and over Blackhawk Pass (11,985′). We enjoyed commanding views in all directions and then descended on a twisting trail complete with switchbacks (yay!) down into a lush forested valley. We were heading for Straight Creek to camel up on water and begin a 22 mile stretch to Taylor Lake at the end of segment 27, the next “reliable” water source. Water is two pounds a liter, something we were not fond of carrying a lot of. Part of our logistics for food and water was to plan knowing when we would have plenty and when we would not. Because of the potential lack of water on this portion of trail, food choices changed dramatically as most of our typical meals need to be re-hydrated. Good thing our breakfasts had become simple, snickers and cold coffee. Lunch, on this stretch, about the same! We kept it easy for the next 24 hours until we got to Taylor Lake. Luckily, in between, we would find a few seasonal water sources that would ease having to carry a lot of water for long periods. Thru-hiking success has many factors, one of the most important, pack weight. We counted ounces and did what we could to find a happy balance between gear choices for creature comfort, and weight of gear, food and water for overall comfort to make the miles necessary to stay on track and meet our daily goals.

At just under 11 miles, we were witness to amazing views all around. Waterfalls, lakes, creeks, wildflowers, wildlife, ridgelines, mountains, valleys and much much more. Take your camera, point and click and you will come away with a beautiful photo. Our pace was quick, our focus acute, we were only 53 miles away from the southern terminus of the Colorado Trail. We couldn’t help but smile and sense the end nearing as we hiked on into segment 26. It was happening, we were almost done, we would finish and embrace the reality of a grand lifetime achievement. We were beginning to see our tramily daily now, we all seemed to have the same silly grin on our faces, our conversations were energetic and our timeline was all merging on the finish. We would camp together, walk together and finish the same day, if not minutes apart, together. We were in a good place and enjoyed the minutes, hours and days as we made our way towards the nearing finish line.

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail Segment 20 of 28

We paused, looking forward into segment 21 and were in awe of the trail as it climbed straight up the other side of the valley as if a stairway to heaven. We had arrived, we were in the San Juan Mountains. We pushed on in silence.

Colorado Trail Segment 20 of 28

Start: Eddiesville TH

End: San Luis Pass

Distance: 12.7 Miles

Segment 20 was a long awaited destination for us, from here the Colorado Trail begins a steady climb into the alpine region where it stays for some time. In and out of treeline for a majority of the trail from this point onward. The beginning of this segment is the lowest altitude we would be at until late in segment 24, but only briefly, and then again at the end, when we would make our final descent into Durango to finish our hike. Often staying between 11,000′ – 12,000′ and touching as high as 13,271′ at the highest point of the Colorado Trail. Apart from our desire to complete the trail as a thru-hike end to end, this is what we came for, the high alpine regions of the San Juan Mountains. Our climb to the saddle of San Luis Peak was one of excitement, a gateway to the high frontier and the coming days of walking across the top of the world. This is a magical place, a place where the stars disappear below you at night and the sun’s rays begin before the valley below is awake. The alpine world is unique, challenging, but oh so rewarding to the traveler who is stubborn enough to venture here. Walk lightly and leave no trace in the alpine, we are merely visitors.

We camped early that evening beside a creek with other hikers we had met on the trail several segments before. We traded stories of our adventures and expressed excitement for the days ahead. The night would be calm deep in the valley, a frost would settle in and welcome us all in the morning as we emerged from our tents. A reminder of the region we were entering and the many cold nights and mornings to come as we traveled into the high country. There is no better reminder of the gain in altitude like the drop in temperatures. We would again see frost many more times for the remainder of our hike. It was getting real, we knew it, our bodies knew it. The energy of the trail had changed, an energy to respect and acknowledge. The weather in these parts is 50 – 50 on any given day. The mountains create their own reality and we would have to stay on alert for storms that could form in minutes above our heads. Wind is a constant. Cold mornings are a fact. The sun is intense. The blue sky is mesmerizing. The stars innumerable. The clouds seem to hug the earth here.

We slowly made our way up to the saddle below San Luis Peak among the fading alpenglow. We arrived early, adorned our down jackets and embraced the views all around. We imagined the climb from our vantage point of 12,612′ up to the summit of San Luis Peak some 1,400 feet above standing tall over us at 14,014′ and thought, about a summit attempt, for a mere second. We had many miles to go, and several big climbs coming, perhaps another day. We moved on, turning away as we were heading off towards our next pass and climb. There are so many inviting side trips along the Colorado Trail, it would take a long time to explore them all. We had a determined plan to hike the CT through, end to end, the extra side trips would be for another time. If the 500 miles of the CT and all of its climbs were not enough for us, well, we would need to examine ourselves further, the CT is full of incredible adventure in and of itself. We crossed up and over another small saddle at 12,366′ and crossed an alpine bench as the end of the segment came into view. We paused, looking forward into segment 21 and were in awe of the trail as it climbed straight up the other side of the valley as if a stairway to heaven. We had arrived, we were in the San Juan Mountains. We pushed on in silence.

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail Segment 9 of 28

The following morning was quite cold as we quickly moved down the trail and dove into what we called, ” the Valley of the Sun.” It was as it sounds, a beautiful valley full of morning sunlight and much needed warmth.

Colorado Trail Segment 9 of 28

Start: Tennessee Pass TH

End: Timberline Lake TH

Distance: 13.6 Miles

Tired? Want a comfortable place to sit and relax? You’re deep in the woods, good luck with that! Unless, of course, you just happen to be .5 miles in on segment 9 of the Colorado Trail and come upon an amazing porch swing just waiting for someone who is tired and needs a comfortable place to sit and relax. What a find. What a surprise. What a wonderful place to sit down and relax. After some long miles on the trail we couldn’t believe our eyes, a swing made for two. We sat, rocked and relaxed. We’ve been talking about it ever since we returned home, matter of fact we talked about it on the trail, giving back to a trail that gave so much to us. It really is amazing the things you come upon, the people you meet and the way things just seem to work out on the Colorado Trail. Something as simple as a porch swing placed along the trail can bring relief to a weary traveler. Trail angels and trail magic come in many forms, and we thank you all for all you do. It is so appreciated.

Segment 9 begins as a leisurely walk in the woods, a good thing for those who are tired and looking for easy terrain. Rest now and enjoy the swing, the Holy Cross Wilderness will sneak up on you and the climbing will begin. All the amazing views come at a price, you will climb to see them, but it’s worth it. But you might want to save some of that energy if you are traveling during mosquito season. Those ravenous blood sucking miniature vampires will stop at nothing to get a sample of your blood. We must have hit it just right because they were out in full force. We ate all meals in our tent, took breaks in our tent, hell, we would have hiked in our tent if it were possible. That said, the Holy Cross Wilderness is absolutely beautiful. Unfortunately, the CT only touches it for a short time. We want to get back in that area and do some exploring in the future.

After entering into the Holy Cross Wilderness, we had been hiking all day, which was a good twenty miles or better if memory serves us. We were actually looking for a good camping spot when we came up on the wilderness boundary and decided to keep going to find a pair of small lakes we had read about, Porcupine Lakes, located near a saddle at about 11,500′ after a healthy 600 foot climb in about a mile. That would just about drain our tank for the day. The setting was amazing though, set just at treeline the lakes appeared as glass reflecting the surrounding peaks. The sunset, as well the sunrise, was magical. The following morning was quite cold as we quickly moved down the trail and dove into what we called, ” the Valley of the Sun.” It was as it sounds, a beautiful valley full of morning sunlight and much needed warmth. Amazing what a little sun can do once it hits you in the early morning. A little sunlight can go a long way to warming you up, even if it is just psychological.

With the warmth on our face, we journeyed on. A new day full of new surprises, new mountain peaks, new valleys, new ridges and new memories. Not one day on the Colorado Trail is the same as the one before. Each day is unique unto itself. There are good days, bad days, blah days and days you don’t even store. The miles go on and on, the days all seem to blend, time stands still, but one thing is for certain, each moment, each turn of the trail, every mountain top and every forest is a new and welcoming experience. We joked before heading out on the Colorado Trail that it would be just thirty plus day hikes back to back. That couldn’t be further from the truth. There is nearly 500 miles of differing and constantly changing terrain out there. Add in an ever-changing cycle of weather, an ever-changing mental and physical challenge and you come away with a truly unique experience. Doubtful that one could hike the Colorado Trial and have the same experience more than once. Thru-hiking is an entirely different animal than its counter parts of day hiking and multi-day backpacking trips.

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail Segment 5 of 28

Sure, we weren’t in the high alpine yet, but we were getting there, and after our low point with the early heat, this was an unexpected gem at lower elevation.

Colorado Trail Segment 5 of 28

Start: Kenosha Pass

End: Long Gulch

Distance: 14.6 Miles

We hiked segment five in reverse, we are a little backwards, but it does keep things interesting! One fact is true about this segment, Kenosha Pass is blanketed in aspen trees. It is definitely a favorite among “leaf peepers” in the fall when the aspens all turn gold, something we are guilty of, just about anyone is guilty of. Cool temperatures, cloudless deep blue skies and shimmering gold aspen leaves just seem to get people’s attention in the fall. Did we mention we love to hike in the fall? We do! After hiking segment five, we just might be returning this winter to snowshoe that segment. The terrain is rolling with no major climbs, aspens are abundant, and then there are the open meadows that just seem to come and go, rotating in and out of pine forests, aspens groves and back again. A recipe for a successful overnight snowshoeing adventure if you ask us.

With the heat of segments one through three behind us, a distant memory now, we enjoyed almost fall like weather. Warm days, not hot, and cool nights. OK, it was a cold night, but comparatively speaking, much better that broiling in the burn scar area of segment two. Granted, the day before we were to hike through this segment, there was a strong storm that moved through catching several hikers off guard. We spoke with a few people who were section hiking and thru-hiking the CT and they just shook their heads, “it was a tough night,” they said. Wind, hail, driving rains and a lot of dangerous lighting. We were eating our lunch as they were laying their gear all about in the sun to dry it off. Everyone generally goes through at least one tough event on trail when thru-hiking. We were hopeful that ours was behind us.

The rolling terrain, mixed forests of pine and aspen and the meadows were expected. But, what we didn’t expect were the expansive views we enjoyed. It really was one of those surprise segments that we didn’t expect much out of. Add in the surplus of water flowing in all the creeks, we’d have to say that this was a great segment. Sure, we weren’t in the high alpine yet, but we were getting there, and after our low point with the early heat, this was an unexpected gem at lower elevation. Did we mention the fall like conditions and that we love to hike in fall? Aspens, running creeks, cool breezes and great views, yep, that was a good segment to hike.

If there were a gripe, and who can’t find something negative to complain about, we’d say there needs to be benches or picnic tables at trailheads. So, we’re being a bit spoiled here, but really, why not. When you’re traveling (on foot) for miles and days on end, having a comfortable place to sit, lean and relax is huge. It goes a long way to keeping oneself relaxed on trail. We could carry ultralight backpacking chairs with us, but we were counting ounces as it was with our gear. Luxury items on a thru-hike are generally kept to a single item, ours were an Anker Power Core and camp shoes, both hugely loved and used on trail the entire hike from Denver to Durango. Our gear was all carefully chosen; weights, usefulness and all. We will certainly be coming out with information on our gear, what worked and what didn’t. Suffice it to say, we chose very carefully before carrying everything almost 500 miles across Colorado.

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail Segment 2 of 28

We have had a share of hardships over the years, we have certainly dealt with our share of challenges, but we chose to do this!

Colorado Trail Segment 2 of 28

Start: South Platte River TH

End: Little Scraggy TH

Distance: 11.5 Miles

Segment two, where do we even begin? It was hot, dry and tested our patience. It’s part of the trail, so, sure, we hiked it. Would we choose to do so otherwise? Yes and no. We have hiked this portion of trail before and liked it, but it was cool, not hot. During the time we were going through this segment, Denver and the surrounding areas had been going through a hot and dry spell, making this a not so pleasant outing. Don’t take this the wrong way, we are just not into hiking in heat, 90s with little to no humidity is not our idea of ideal conditions. Matter of fact, it is about thirty degrees off the mark! That said, segment two is actually very unique and beautiful holding vast views in all directions in the midst of a regenerating forest.

In 1996 a wildfire, caused by humans, burned almost 12,000 acres in the Pike National Forest where segment two runs through. Today, some 23 years later, the area is still in the process of regrowth. Sadly, it still lacks trees, where mostly it is just covered in ground plants, grasses and flowers. Aspens are beginning to pop up here and there, but it will be many, many years before pines begin to fill back in. Interestingly, even in this post-burn environment, it is quite beautiful to be able to, not only see the raw state of the landscape, but the new growth in the evolution of a redeveloping forest. Uniquely beautiful is probably the best way to describe this area. That, and dry. There are no naturally running streams to be had in the warm months making this trek difficult on hot days in the summer. The nearest water source after the Platte River is ten miles away at the volunteer fire station, an oasis to thru-hikers of the Colorado Trail coming off segment two.

We must have had our first realization that we were actually hiking the CT on this segment. Realizing that many of the hikers we were now sharing the trail with were probably half our age, we took a time out to accept we would be slower than most, do smaller mileage days and need a break here and there. In our fifties, this trail would test us to our core. Day hiking and backpacking for a few days, yeah, we can do that. But, thirty plus days of getting up everyday at first light and putting in fifteen to twenty miles, hiking eight to ten hour days, well, that was going to be quite the accomplishment. We have had a share of hardships over the years, we have certainly dealt with our share of challenges, but we chose to do this! We still had some 470 miles to go. One day at time. One mile at a time some days. We made small goals and paid no attention to the trail rising in front of us as, yet another climb came into view. It really is more of a mental test versus a physical one. For us, anyway. Yeah, segment two was our OMG moment on trail, we are really doing this.

We lifted our umbrellas as if taunting the afternoon sun, opened them up and walked on, baking in the shade and swallowing sand as we went. We caught occasional glimpses of the distant high peaks and began to dream of snow covered mountaintops offering up cold running streams that flowed through meadows full of wildflowers. Amazingly, we did find that awaiting us after a few more days of hiking through the foothills. Soon enough, the heat would give way to cooler temperatures. Until then, we sufficed to say, we would get stronger as each day passed. We did just that. We love hiking in the alpine of Colorado, but never as much as this year. After having hiked through much lower terrain, our appreciation for the lush alpine had never been so strong. Sometimes you have to give yourself a reality check to be able to enjoy what you truly love and enjoy the most. Sometimes you just get a reality check, without asking for it. We pushed on, out of segment two, looking west towards the Colorado Rocky Mountains and the Continental Divide.

Peace,

MAD

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Abyss Lake Trail

There were three water crossings ahead of us, the creeks were raging with snowmelt and the temperatures the night before had dipped below freezing. The thin log bridges that we would need to traverse were now covered in ice.

Our latest outing was in the Mt Evan’s Wilderness, a wilderness area that encompasses over 74,000 acres, has two mountains at over 14,000′ and an abundance of wildlife and trail options. We chose the Abyss Lake Trail for several reasons, a couple being water and wildlife, but mostly because it is a trail we have never been on. With our continued conditioning for the Colorado Trail, we have been backpacking routes that will challenge us and, like the CT, are unfamiliar, a factor that keeps our mental and physical faculties alert for constant change.

This outing was to be no different. We put all of our gear, food and supplies in our packs for an overnight hike. Our goal was a sub-alpine bowl centered amongst several prominent mountain peaks, two of which towered above 14,000′ in elevation. With the snow melt in full swing we knew water sources would be plentiful and the trail conditions mixed. Spring hiking in Colorado can be challenging with snow, ice, mud and water in constant battle for the trail’s surface. In most cases, one usually encounters all of these on any given path above 10,000′ as you climb higher, sometimes losing the trail or finding it somewhat obscured.

Though wanting to experience a new trail, and wanting that trail to be unfamiliar, we prepared for any and all conditions. Snowshoes and microspikes strapped to the backs of our packs, we made our way from the trailhead up the trail not knowing what we would find. Granted we were aware of what the weather forecast was calling for, we also know it can deviate and bring surprises in mountain terrain. Possible thunderstorms, overnight temperatures in the high twenties to low thirties and daytime temperatures in the sixties, we found the environment to be likely what we will be experiencing on the Colorado Trail this summer.

This outing, and the ones we have been going out on of late, are geared just to this point, preparing for a thru-hike in changing conditions and at altitude. We only have a visual overview and a rather active imagination when it comes to the Colorado Trail. Sure, we know the technicalities, but until one walks the just under five hundred mile trail, there really is no way to know what it truly is like. One could even state, each person’s journey will be completely unique , and rightly so. Alas, the trail is in constant change and provides a different story for each individual every new season.

Our hike on the Abyss Lake Trail, no different. What we planned for is exactly what we got, the unknown and ever changing conditions of a wilderness experience. Perfect training scenario in preparation for the CT. Our hike up was mostly uneventful, and finding our destination came rather easy. Once there we began our tasks of making camp. Tent in place, water filtered and lunch made, we settled in and enjoyed our new alpine surroundings. Evening came and with it a few passing thunderstorms that had us shelter in our tent until they passed. Afterwards a little exploration and back to camp for the night.

It wasn’t until the next morning that our uneventful expedition would change and the wilderness would have a few lessons in store for us. We gathered our belongings, packed our gear and headed out on our trek back to civilization. We thought, well, at the very least we got a decent workout and some more experience with our gear. Simple enough, or so we thought. The first four letters of wilderness are anyone’s clue to their surroundings when in the high country. Expect the unexpected.

There were three water crossings ahead of us, the creeks were raging with snowmelt and the temperatures the night before had dipped below freezing. The thin log bridges that we would need to traverse were now covered in ice. With no way around we contemplated waiting on the heat of the sun, several hours away. We looked up and down stream, no go. The decision was made, we would cross on our hands and knees. Our hands and knees were freezing and slipping on the ice, the spray from the water raging beneath was frigid, and the roar was deafening. The log bridge seemed to grow in length as we inched our way across the ice with full packs on our backs and Mia secure in her front pouch.

One down, two more to go. We can do this, we thought to ourselves. Our new found confidence was quickly put on hold as we came near a bull moose staring at us just off trail. Slowly and gently we moved on as not to startle him any more than we already may have. Sigh of relief followed by another heart pounding moose encounter. This time a female on trail coming straight for us. We all met with our eyes long enough to say “shit” or however a moose might say it! She must have thought, these two and their little chihuahua must be crazy because she no sooner turned and went the other way disappearing into a thick aspen grove as we began breathing again.

With bridge number two now in sight we saw another hiker sitting on the bank waiting for the sun and watched curiously as we did our eloquent ice crawl to the other side. He reluctantly followed in like fashion. Perhaps it was the first bridge or maybe the two moose, but now we were on a mission. After we crossed the last ice laden bridge we were home free, settled in and began a more leisurely hike to the parking lot. Enjoying the last views of swollen white-water creeks, lazy morning meadows, dense mixed forests of pine and aspen, all backdropped by snowcapped peaks, we hated to leave. The Colorado Trail will have so much more!

Peace,

MAD

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DAM Hippies

“We are nothing more than two people, two love-struck teenagers, who finally found each other and discovered how we complete one another in a magical and mysterious way that we will always be very grateful for.”

Miller and Debbie Harrell, Running Away Was Not an Option

Who do you think of when you think of a band? Many generally will name the lead vocalist first. After all they are the ones up front singing the songs, interacting with the masses, putting a face with the name. But, as we all know, there’s much much more going on behind the voice.

The music, the harmony, the energy and the beat all drive the song. Everything coming together to create the music we all hear, feel and yes, see. It is a team effort coming together in one singularity creating the chemistry that will produce the music we all love to experience.

That same premise exists within MAD Hippies Life. One stroke of the pen could easily have put an ‘ on the end of Hippies, giving the notation that it is our life. As many of you already know, there would be no MAD without the M or the D. Read more on our About us page if you haven’t already and you will quickly see what I am saying. For 37 years it has been MAD, it will always be MAD in the simplest of terms, as it began and is today, “We’re MAD!”

Why the clarification? Sometimes people just need to know. Sometimes they need to be reminded. Sometimes they just don’t know. Well, here it is. A duet if you will, making music in our own way, sharing it with the masses. We are two working together through life as one.

I wrote Debbie a letter several years ago that spelled out something in my heart that not even she really knew. That same letter holds true to this day. If I were to add to that letter today, it would include the gratification I have for someone that always goes beyond what is necessary and gives that extra helping of quality to a job done with the most thoroughness a person could possibly give. Debbie is always working to make sure everyone is taken care of, even the most menial task receives the highest of treatments. She always puts herself last, if at all. She has made more sacrifices than many would have made in several lifetimes to make sure her family was taken care of. Goals, dreams, aspirations always on hold for someone else’s needs.

When you ooh and aww at our photos, remember who it was that brought that imperfect exposure back to life, remember who it was that brought out the unseen details and who it was that gave the colors back their life. When you read this post, remember who it was that made changes making sure it is presented properly versus the grossly misspelled and erroneous grammar in which it was penned. When you see our rough edges becoming more refined in the details of who we are and what we do, remember who worked diligently to research the ins and outs of how we should move forward.

There is no doubt we are a team, I’ve always appreciated how well we meld together as a couple, as friends and in general as two people meandering through life together. I love how Debbie challenges me to be better. When you ask one of us anything, when you say something to one of us or when you speak about one of us, you are effectively referring to both of us. If you are in need, you don’t get one, you get both.

Yes, we are MAD. What I would like to let everyone know, see and understand is that just like a band, there is much more than the person holding the microphone. There is much more going on behind the voice. There is an incredible person, woman, friend, wife, mother, grandmother, photographer, editor and so much more who is not just behind the scenes, but equally in front working diligently to make everything succeed. Her name is Debbie, the D in MAD.

It could have been just as easy to be the DAM Hippies! Alas, we are where we are and love our lives together. Left to just myself, doubtful anyone would see much of anything. I’m not that sensitive of a person, I don’t really give attention where attention is due. One thing is for sure, if not for Debbie I’d have found myself either six feet under by now or lost in some lifeless abyss without a notion of what life really is. She completes me, completes MAD and makes us both better people.

In the end it will be just as it was in the beginning, an eternal proclamation that “We’re MAD.” Simple, to the point and as it should be. We are nothing more than two people, two love-struck teenagers, who finally found each other and discovered how we complete one another in a magical and mysterious way that we will always be very grateful for.

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail #2

“A roll of toilet paper seems to go for a while until it gets near the end and then it goes really fast.”

March 2019, 4 months till the Colorado Trail

Today was the first day, in what seems to have been a very long time, that we did not wake up to frost, ice or snow. It definitely felt warmer, not that that’s saying much, probably 34° or so, but definitely above freezing. That said, bring on spring and warmer temperatures!

With four months to go, we have all but completed our gear list. Our sleep system, shelter, packs, cook system, water system and electronics are all dialed in and ready. We now move on to finalizing our menu, resupply towns, personal items and clothing. Physically we also continue to log miles whenever and wherever possible.

Winter in Colorado has been, well, winter. After several dry years that resulted in a drought, the snow machine has once again been let loose. At this time the Colorado snowpack is well above average with more time for continued accumulation. That said, we have stopped worrying about water sources on trail and have begun considering that many of the high passes will hold their snow well beyond summer.

It has been somewhat challenging to try and mimic trail conditions on any given outing as we continue to log miles with our packs full. The snow just keeps coming leaving many places we might normally use as a “full pack workout” covered in snow and ice. We have been getting creative nonetheless, wearing ice spikes or hiking as early as possible before packed snow begins to get soft with added sunlight. Other days are spent on level surfaces with increased miles, while other, more inclement days, are just spent inside using our own exercise equipment. Spring and early summer will bring better hiking conditions and increased accessibility to trails with more demanding gains and higher altitude.

We are so ready for long, warm days on trail! Watching the calendar certainly isn’t helping matters, though it is somewhat like a silly quote we recently heard, “A roll of toilet paper seems to go for a while until it gets near the end and then it goes really fast.” This will more than likely be the case for us, for now it is a slow wait, but soon time will accelerate and before you know it we will be on the Colorado Trail.

We have gone over the route and have written it out at least a half dozen times, looking at the details of each day, each segment and each resupply point. We have carefully chosen our gear, food and electronics. Sometimes we ask ourselves if we are crazy for doing this, some days we just feel like we are going crazy waiting. We have watched videos, viewed pictures and talked with others who have already made the trek. We have already experienced many of the early segments in previous years and look forward to points beyond. Waiting is hard, but we welcome the time we have left to continue with our planning and dream of the trail before us.

Peace,

MAD

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Colorado Trail #1

“Trail life is full of oohs and awes, but they are also filled with sighs, four letter words and pain”

January 2019, 6 months till the Colorado Trail

Many adventures begin with vision, albeit a personal challenge, a quest for spiritual awakening, a test of physical endurance or just a plain desire to explore uncharted territories never seen before. Adventures allow us to embark on journeys that impact us on so many levels. For us, our desire to hike the Colorado Trail in its entirety is probably more of a mix, encompassing aspects of all of the above. Though desire and vision can have skewed lines, reality usually swoops in and serves up a surprise, delivering, if you will, what you need instead. That said, our first installment of “The Colorado Trail” should be compared to the last. We will see you on the backside!

As we move through the planning and preparation stages of hiking the Colorado Trail, the vision still remains the same, granted how it will unfold seems to be changing the more in tune we become with the details. We know it will be tough, no backpacking trip we have ever taken was easy. Trail life is full of oohs and awes, but they are also filled with sighs, four letter words and pain. To see the remote wilderness firsthand is no easy endeavor, hence the remote part. One would be a fool not to expect challenging conditions full of hardships that must be overcome in order to embrace the reward. Long days on trail, encountering rough terrain, ever-changing weather, endless pounding of your feet, tired legs and the mind games we tend to grapple with as each false summit is reached are all part of backpacking. To glorify such extensive treks without talking about the difficulties would be irresponsible on our part, only setting others less traveled up for failure.

These constant reminders beg the question we have all no doubt asked ourselves at one time or another, “why am I doing this?” The answer comes just as the question itself is asked, “the silence of remote beauty, the stillness of the mind when the modern world is left behind and the imaginative ponderings of what lies beyond the next mountain peak draw us in.” Many will indeed walk to the edge of the world, few will take the leap into the unknown. Fear has a long history of keeping us locked into the comfort of our own personal domains, where curiosity opens the door. Stepping forward through that door is a decision that must be made with a combination of a sound mind and a form of lunacy. Who in their right mind would walk 500 miles, or more, exposed to the elements and trekking across difficult mountainous terrain? Someone crazy enough to do it, yet sane enough to understand the dangers.

Currently, on our kitchen table, across the living room, into the bedroom and basically on any unoccupied flat space available, we have accumulated information, gear and necessary items for our CT adventure. Each has purpose, even multipurpose if we are doing it right. Our gear is as light as we can get it while still remaining comfortable on trail. Our necessities for safety easily fall into the must go category, and go whether we like it or not. Then there is the plethora of information strewn about that we read through that fits perfectly in the backs of our minds filed away as mental notes. If such items were to be physically carried we would need a team of pack mules along for the ride. Food and water are paramount. The science behind how much to take, what we should take and when to eat can be as daunting as the first big climb. Alas, these things are all part of a successful outing into the unknown and untamed Colorado Rocky Mountain wilderness.

Route planning seems pretty straightforward, glancing at the map(s). But, and that is a rather big pause for consideration, just because we can draw a line from here to there doesn’t answer the many questions of how far we will, or need, to travel on any given day. It won’t necessarily tell you which water sources will be available at any given time. And, by and far, no map in the world will tell you the weather! Many of these question can be preplanned, but certainty won’t necessarily come until that moment arrives. Flexibility on trail is another key to a successful outing. The following statement addresses this, spelling out variables that will be addressed on trail. Knowing the situation will arise is planning enough sometimes, being open to various contingencies is a must.

“Day 3, feeling strong, twenty mile water carry, three days worth of food, mostly downhill with one major climb, sixteen miles(?), water and camping through miles 11-16, let’s hope for good weather.”

This is where we really dig in and begin to eat and breathe the CT and its many attributes that bind together our desire and vision. Drawing from varied sources such as past hikers, trusted meteorologists, gear manufacturers, printed and digital materials, we prepare both physically and mentally. We prepare for the known and unknown. We wait patiently for our first steps that will thrust us into an adventure of a lifetime.

Peace,

MAD

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